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What makes you click mate preferences in online dating

What makes you click?—Mate preferences in online dating,Having used one or two other PLR, My best version of 26 years

We estimate mate preferences using a novel data set from an online dating service. The data set contains detailed information on user attributes and the decision to contact a potential mate  · We estimate mate preferences using a novel data set from an online dating service. The data set contains detailed information on user attributes and the decision to We estimate mate preferences using a novel data set from an online dating service. The data set contains detailed information on user attributes and the decision to contact a We use a large-scale dataset from a commercial online dating site to examine individuals' decisions to approach and select potential romantic partners. To understand what features What makes you click mate preferences in online dating. starbuzz usa nfl stars dating celebs blogger.com online dating addiction statistics Now you really know a lot more about each ... read more

Distinctive patterns arise by. Charlotte WANG. In many societies, parents are involved in selecting a spouse for their child, and integrate this with decisions about migration and educational investment.

What type of spouse do parents want for their children? Preference data are elicited from parents or other relatives who actively search for a spouse on behalf of their adult child in Kunming, China. Economic variables income and real estate ownership are important for the choice of sons-in-law, but not daughters-in-law.

Education is valued on both sides. We simulate marriage outcomes based on preferences for age and education and compare them with marriage patterns in the general population. Homogamy by education can be explained by parental preferences, but not by age: parents prefer younger wives, yet most couples are the same age.

Additionally collected preference data from students can explain age distributions. Survey data from pare Michael French. Philip Robins. Frank Heiland. John Rizzo. Climent Quintana-Domeque.

John Myles. leonardo Felli. Dominique Meurs. Jill Findeis. Leonardo Felli. Giovanni Busetta. Analia Schlosser. Laura Argys. Robert Moffitt. Elina Lampi. Teresa Taningco Kaldor. Antonio Spilimbergo. Aaron Sojourner. Jennie Brand.

Christian Gregory. Patrick J McEwan. Robert Horselenberg. Ricky N Lawton , Fujiwara, Daniel. Analisa Packham. Chloé Michel. Juha Siikamaki. Laura M Crispin. Martin Kolk. Alessandra Pelloni. Aslan Zorlu. Federico Perali. Walter Theseira , Jessica Pan.

Ratul Mahanta. Laura Perna. Euna Han. Aminur Rahman. harald tauchmann. Lori Taylor , Matthew Springer. Log in with Facebook Log in with Google. Remember me on this computer. Enter the email address you signed up with and we'll email you a reset link. Need an account?

Click here to sign up. Download Free PDF. What Makes You Click? Lee Harkwin. Abstract We estimate mate preferences using a novel data set from an online dating service. Continue Reading Download Free PDF. Related Papers. Quarterly Journal of Economics Gender Differences in Mate Selection: Evidence from a Speed Dating Experiment.

Download Free PDF View PDF. Review of Economic Studies Racial Preferences in Dating. School ties: An analysis of homophily in an adolescent friendship network.

Essays on matching, marriage and human capital accumulation. Propose with a rose? Signaling in internet dating markets. Black-White Marital Matching: Race, Anthropometrics, and Socioeconomics. LABOUR Beauty and the Labor Market: Accounting for the Additional Effects of Personality and Grooming. Social Science Research Personal traits, cohabitation, and marriage. Big and Beautiful? Evidence of Racial Differences in the Perceived Attractiveness of Obese Female Adolescents.

Hitsch Ali Hortaçsu Dan Ariely University of Chicago University of Chicago Duke University Booth School of Business Department of Economics Fuqua School of Business January Abstract We estimate mate preferences using a novel data set from an online dating service. Race preferences do not differ across users with different age, income, or education levels in the case of women, and differ only slightly in the case of men.

iv There are gender differences in mate preferences; in particular, women have a stronger preference than men for income over physical attributes.

Any previously reported results not contained in this paper or in the companion piece Hitsch et al. We thank Babur De los Santos, Chris Olivola, Tim Miller, and David Wood for their excellent research assistance. We are grateful to Elizabeth Bruch, Jean-Pierre Dubé, Eli Finkel, Emir Kamenica, Derek Neal, Peter Rossi, Betsey Stevenson, and Utku Ünver for comments and suggestions. Seminar participants at the AEA meetings, Boston College, the Caltech Matching Conference, the Choice Symposium in Estes Park, the Conference on Marriage and Matching at New York University , the ELSE Labora- tory Experiments and the Field LEaF Conference, Northwestern University, the SESP Preconference in Chicago, SITE , the University of Pennsylvania, the QME Conference, UC Berkeley, UCLA, the University of Chicago, UCL, the University of Naples Federico II, the University of Toronto, Stanford GSB, and Yale University provided valuable comments.

This research was supported by the Kilts Center of Marketing Hitsch , a John M. Olin Junior Faculty Fellowship, and the National Science Foundation, SES Hortaçsu. Please address all correspondence to Hitsch guenter. hitsch chicagobooth. edu , Hortaçsu hortacsu uchicago. edu , or Ariely dandan duke. We contribute to this literature using a novel data set obtained from an online dating service. We utilize detailed information on the partner search behavior of the site users to infer their revealed mate preferences.

Our data allow us to estimate a rich preference specification that takes into account a large number of partner attributes, including detailed demographic and socioeconomic information, physical characteristics, and other information such as religion and political views.

Our data allow us to address three important questions the literature raises on mate preferences and marriage. The first question see, e. We call mate characteristics that are valued differently depending on own traits horizontal attributes, and characteristics that are agreed upon vertical attributes.

Both types of preferences can lead to empirically observed assortative mating patterns Becker , Browning et al. For example, sorting on educational attainment highly educated women date or marry highly educated men may be the result of a preference for a mate with a similar education level. Alternatively, the same outcome can arise in equilibrium as a stable matching in a market in which all men and women prefer a highly educated partner over a less educated one.

The second question, which is closely related to the first question, specifically concerns the existence of same-race preferences. In the United States, marriages across ethnic groups are relatively rare, which could be due to same-race preferences or, alternatively, the fact that members of one ethnic group predominantly meet other members of the same ethnic group Kalmijn , Fisman et al. Our study provides new insights into the currently existing literature on estimating same-race preferences.

The third question concerns the existence of gender differences in mate preferences. This question is the subject of a vast literature, especially in psychology but also in other fields e. Several theories, such as evolutionary psychology Buss , Buss and Schmitt and social structure theory Eagly and Wood , predict gender differences. Beyond providing new insights into the three questions posed, our study makes data and methodological contributions to the literature on mate preferences.

First, we base our results on a large and detailed data set. We utilize information on the attributes and mate search behavior of 6, users of an online dating service in two U. metropolitan areas. Second, most of the seminal studies in the mate preference literature e. Buss are based on stated preference data, which may not reflect actual, revealed mate preferences. Eastwick and Finkel and Todd et al. Stated preferences regarding a partner of a different race may be particularly unreliable, a suspicion our results in Section 5.

Using data from speed-dating experiments, research parallel to ours has pursued a similar approach to estimating revealed mate preferences Kurzban and Weeden , Fisman et al. Our work is also related to a literature that estimates mate preferences from observations on marriages using equilibrium restrictions of marriage market models e.

In contrast to this literature, our data allow us to observe the partner search process directly, providing us with information regard- ing the choice sets and partner choices. Our data also contain more detailed mate attribute information; for example, the U. Census data do not include measures of physical traits or life-style variables. Third, an important methodological concern is whether people act strategically in a way that shades their true preferences. This concern is relevant both for our approach based on online dating data and the speed-dating literature.

In Section 4, we discuss two tests for the shading hypothesis, and reject that strategic behavior plays an important role in our data.

We show how to correct for the potential bias in preference estimates due to strategic behavior. This approach can be utilized in environments where preference shading is an important concern.

One important question we cannot answer entirely is whether the estimated preferences apply to dating or other short-term relationships, or whether these preferences are also rele- vant for long-term relationships and marriages.

In Hitsch et al. Sprecher et al. However, they find some important gender differences, in particular the common finding that women place more emphasis on earnings potential relative to physical attractive- ness compared to men, in the stated mate preferences for both a short- and long-term partner. Hence, some evidence exists that mate preferences inferred from online dating behavior may also apply to long-term relationships or marriages.

The ultimate test of this claim, however, may require follow-up data on marriages that result from relationships initially formed on an online dating site.

The current paper is complementary to a related study, Hitsch et al. Hitsch et al. This paper also provides an extended description of the data and a full discussion of strategic behavior. The users indicate various demographic, socioeconomic, and physical characteristics, such as their age, gender, education level, height, weight, and income.

In addition, the users provide information that relates to their personality, 2 Lee and Banerjee et al. The data used byLee allow her to follow the users of a matchmaking service through several stages of the dating process until an eventual marriage, and she adds a learning component to the choice model. For example, the site members indicate whether they are divorced, whether they have children, their religious and political views, and whether they are open to dating a partner with a different ethnic background.

All this information is either numeric such as age and weight or an answer to a multiple-choice question, and hence quantifiable and usable for our statistical analysis. The users can also answer essay questions that provide more detailed information about their attitudes and personalities. Our analysis cannot use this information. Many users also include one or more photos in their profile. After registering, the users can browse, search, and interact with the other members of the dating service.

Typically, users start their search by indicating in a databse query form a preferred age range and geographic location for their partners.

By clicking on one of the short profiles, the searcher can view the full user profile, which contains socioeconomic and demographic information, a larger version of the profile photo and possibly additional photos , and answers to several essay questions. Upon reviewing this detailed profile, the searcher decides whether to send an e-mail to the user. Our data contain a detailed, second-by-second account of all these user activities. In particular, we know if and when a user browses another user, views his or her photo s , and sends an e-mail to another user.

In order to initiate a contact by e-mail, a user has to become a paying member of the dating service. Once the subscription fee is paid, there is no limit to the number of e-mails a user can send. One CPS sample is representative of the general population in Boston and San Diego, the other is restricted to Internet users in the two metropolitan areas. We find that men are somewhat overrepresented in the online dating sample, and that, as expected, users of the dating service are younger than the population at large.

Also, the site users are more educated and have higher incomes than the general population. Overall, however, no stark differences exist between the sample of online users and the population at large regarding socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. A first-contact e-mail is an initial, introductory e-mail that a user sends to a potential partner after viewing his or profile.

The analysis of mate preferences is based on a sub-sample of 3, men and 2, women5 , which we selected from the full sample based on two criteria. First, in their profiles, all users state their reason for joining the dating site. Users seeking a casual relationship account for 4 percent of all user activities, as measured by first-contact e-mails sent; all other excluded users account for 11 percent of all activities.

The latter three groups are likely to include users who want to sound less committal than those who state that they want to start a long-term relationship.

Table 1 provides summary statistics of the user attributes. Applying the two selection criteria, we end up with , observations of user actions browsed profiles for men and , observations for women. The men sent a first-contact e-mail to That women are more selective, in the sense that they approach fewer potential mates in their choice set than men, has been found in the speed-dating literature as well e.

However, the primary difference in mate search behavior in our data concerns the much larger number of potential mates men browse. A possible concern about our data is that the users might misrepresent some of their at- tributes. We cannot directly address this concern. However, we can compare the distribution of some reported characteristics with information from a more general sample. We find that the average weight reported by the women in our sample is somewhat lower than the average weight in the population, whereas the average weight reported by men is slightly higher.

The stated height of both men and women is somewhat above the U. Therefore, this comparison provides little evidence of misrepresentation. To construct an attractiveness rating for these available photos, we recruited subjects from the University of Chicago GSB Decision Research Lab mailing list. Buss, D. Sex differences in human mate preferences: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 12 , 1— The evolution of desire: Strategies of human mating.

New York: Basic Books. Google Scholar. Sexual strategies theory: An evolutionary perspective on human mating. Psychological Review, 2 , — Choo, E. Who marries whom and why. Journal of Political Economy, 1 , — Eagly, A. The origins of sex differences in human behavior. American Psychologist, 54 6 , — Eastwick, P. Sex differences in mate preferences revisited: Do people know what they initially desire in a romantic partner? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94 2 , — Is love colorblind?

Political orientation and interracial romantic desire. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 35 9 , — Etcoff, N. Survival of the prettiest: The science of beauty. New York: Doubleday Books. Finkel, E. Baumeister Attraction and rejection. Finkel Eds. New York: Oxford University Press. Fisman, R.

Gender differences in mate selection: Evidence from a speed dating experiment. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2 , — Racial preferences in dating. Review of Economic Studies, 75 , — Gillis, J. The male-taller norm in mate selection. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 6 3 , — Goldberger, A.

Abnormal selection bias. Karlin, T. Goodman Eds. New York: Academic. Hamermesh, D. Beauty and the labor market. American Economic Review, 84 5 , — Heckman, J. Sample selection bias as specification error. Econometrica, 47 1 , — Varieties of selection bias. American Economic Review, 80 2 , — Hitsch, G. Matching and sorting in online dating. American Economic Review, 1 , — Kalmijn, M. Intermarriage and homogamy: Causes, patterns, trends.

Annual Review of Sociology, 24 , — Kenrick, D. Age preferences in mates reflect sex differences in human reproductive strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 15 , 75— Kurzban, R.

HurryDate: Mate preferences in action. Evolution and Human Behavior, 26 , — Langlois, J. Maxims or myths of beauty? A meta-analytic and theoretical review. Psychological Bulletin, 3 , — Lee, S.

Marriage and online mate search services: Evidence from South Korea. manuscript University of Maryland. Little, R. A note about models for selectivity bias. Econometrica, 53 6 , — Maisey, D. Characteristics of male attractiveness for women. The data set contains detailed information on user attributes and the decision to contact a potential mate after viewing his or her profile. This decision provides the basis for our preference estimation approach.

A potential problem arises if the site users strategically shade their true preferences. We provide a simple test and a bias correction method for strategic behavior.

The main findings are i There is no evidence for strategic behavior. ii Men and women have a strong preference for similarity along many but not all attributes. iii In particular, the site users display strong same-race preferences. Race preferences do not differ across users with different age, income, or education levels in the case of women, and differ only slightly in the case of men. For men, but not for women, the revealed same-race preferences correspond to the same-race preference stated in the users' profile.

iv There are gender differences in mate preferences; in particular, women have a stronger preference than men for income over physical attributes. Itamar Simonson. We study dating behavior using data from a Speed Dating experiment where we generate random matching of subjects and create random variation in the number of potential partners.

Our design allows us to directly observe individual decisions rather than just final matches. Women put greater weight on the intelligence and the race of partner, while men respond more to physical. Simon Burgess. David Autor. This thesis explores the link between human capital accumulation and the functioning of marriage markets. The first chapter studies the effect of marriage market conditions on pre-marital investment. After showing how a change in the sex ratio can alter incentives for investments, I test this prediction using exogenous variation in the marriage market sex ratio, brought about by immigration, exploiting the preference of second generation Americans for endogamous matches.

Muriel Niederle. ABSTRACT The large literature on costly signaling and the somewhat scant literature on preference signaling had varying success in showing the effectiveness of signals. We use a field experiment to show that even when everyone can send a signal, signals are free and the only costs are opportunity costs, sending a signal increases the chances of success.

Pierre-andré Chiappori. We analyze the interaction of race with physical and socioeconomic characteristics in the U. marriage market, using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics from to for black, white, and inter-racial couples. We consider the anthropometric characteristics of both spouses, together with their wage and education, and estimate who inter-racially marries whom along these dimensions.

Distinctive patterns arise by. Charlotte WANG. In many societies, parents are involved in selecting a spouse for their child, and integrate this with decisions about migration and educational investment. What type of spouse do parents want for their children?

Preference data are elicited from parents or other relatives who actively search for a spouse on behalf of their adult child in Kunming, China. Economic variables income and real estate ownership are important for the choice of sons-in-law, but not daughters-in-law.

Education is valued on both sides. We simulate marriage outcomes based on preferences for age and education and compare them with marriage patterns in the general population. Homogamy by education can be explained by parental preferences, but not by age: parents prefer younger wives, yet most couples are the same age. Additionally collected preference data from students can explain age distributions. Survey data from pare Philip Robins. Michael French. Frank Heiland. Climent Quintana-Domeque. John Myles.

leonardo Felli , Michael Stern. Dominique Meurs. Jill Findeis. Giovanni Busetta. Leonardo Felli. Robert Moffitt. Joshua Angrist. Laura Argys.

Teresa Taningco Kaldor. Elina Lampi. Christian Gregory. Aaron Sojourner. Antonio Spilimbergo. Robert Horselenberg. Jennie Brand. Analisa Packham. Patrick J McEwan. Ricky N Lawton , Fujiwara, Daniel. Chloé Michel. Walter Theseira , Jessica Pan. Olivia Mitchell.

Lori Taylor , Matthew Springer. Alessandra Pelloni. Laura M Crispin. Euna Han. Juha Siikamaki. Martin Kolk. Ratul Mahanta. Melani Cammett. Federico Perali. Dan Horsky. Aslan Zorlu. harald tauchmann. Log in with Facebook Log in with Google.

Remember me on this computer. Enter the email address you signed up with and we'll email you a reset link. Need an account? Click here to sign up. Download Free PDF. What Makes You Click? Juvy Jane De Dios. Abstract We estimate mate preferences using a novel data set from an online dating service. Continue Reading Download Free PDF. Related Papers. Quarterly Journal of Economics Gender Differences in Mate Selection: Evidence from a Speed Dating Experiment.

Download Free PDF View PDF. Review of Economic Studies Racial Preferences in Dating. School ties: An analysis of homophily in an adolescent friendship network. Essays on matching, marriage and human capital accumulation. Propose with a rose? Signaling in internet dating markets. Black-White Marital Matching: Race, Anthropometrics, and Socioeconomics. LABOUR Beauty and the Labor Market: Accounting for the Additional Effects of Personality and Grooming.

Social Science Research Personal traits, cohabitation, and marriage. Big and Beautiful? Evidence of Racial Differences in the Perceived Attractiveness of Obese Female Adolescents. Hitsch Ali Hortaçsu Dan Ariely University of Chicago University of Chicago Duke University Booth School of Business Department of Economics Fuqua School of Business January Abstract We estimate mate preferences using a novel data set from an online dating service.

Any previously reported results not contained in this paper or in the companion piece Hitsch et al. We thank Babur De los Santos, Chris Olivola, Tim Miller, and David Wood for their excellent research assistance.

We are grateful to Elizabeth Bruch, Jean-Pierre Dubé, Eli Finkel, Emir Kamenica, Derek Neal, Peter Rossi, Betsey Stevenson, and Utku Ünver for comments and suggestions. Seminar participants at the AEA meetings, Boston College, the Caltech Matching Conference, the Choice Symposium in Estes Park, the Conference on Marriage and Matching at New York University , the ELSE Labora- tory Experiments and the Field LEaF Conference, Northwestern University, the SESP Preconference in Chicago, SITE , the University of Pennsylvania, the QME Conference, UC Berkeley, UCLA, the University of Chicago, UCL, the University of Naples Federico II, the University of Toronto, Stanford GSB, and Yale University provided valuable comments.

This research was supported by the Kilts Center of Marketing Hitsch , a John M. Olin Junior Faculty Fellowship, and the National Science Foundation, SES Hortaçsu. Please address all correspondence to Hitsch guenter.

hitsch chicagobooth. edu , Hortaçsu hortacsu uchicago. edu , or Ariely dandan duke. We contribute to this literature using a novel data set obtained from an online dating service. We utilize detailed information on the partner search behavior of the site users to infer their revealed mate preferences. Our data allow us to estimate a rich preference specification that takes into account a large number of partner attributes, including detailed demographic and socioeconomic information, physical characteristics, and other information such as religion and political views.

Our data allow us to address three important questions the literature raises on mate preferences and marriage. The first question see, e. We call mate characteristics that are valued differently depending on own traits horizontal attributes, and characteristics that are agreed upon vertical attributes. Both types of preferences can lead to empirically observed assortative mating patterns Becker , Browning et al.

For example, sorting on educational attainment highly educated women date or marry highly educated men may be the result of a preference for a mate with a similar education level.

Alternatively, the same outcome can arise in equilibrium as a stable matching in a market in which all men and women prefer a highly educated partner over a less educated one. The second question, which is closely related to the first question, specifically concerns the existence of same-race preferences.

In the United States, marriages across ethnic groups are relatively rare, which could be due to same-race preferences or, alternatively, the fact that members of one ethnic group predominantly meet other members of the same ethnic group Kalmijn , Fisman et al.

Our study provides new insights into the currently existing literature on estimating same-race preferences. The third question concerns the existence of gender differences in mate preferences.

This question is the subject of a vast literature, especially in psychology but also in other fields e. Several theories, such as evolutionary psychology Buss , Buss and Schmitt and social structure theory Eagly and Wood , predict gender differences. Beyond providing new insights into the three questions posed, our study makes data and methodological contributions to the literature on mate preferences. First, we base our results on a large and detailed data set.

We utilize information on the attributes and mate search behavior of 6, users of an online dating service in two U. metropolitan areas. Second, most of the seminal studies in the mate preference literature e. Buss are based on stated preference data, which may not reflect actual, revealed mate preferences. Eastwick and Finkel and Todd et al. Stated preferences regarding a partner of a different race may be particularly unreliable, a suspicion our results in Section 5.

Using data from speed-dating experiments, research parallel to ours has pursued a similar approach to estimating revealed mate preferences Kurzban and Weeden , Fisman et al.

Our work is also related to a literature that estimates mate preferences from observations on marriages using equilibrium restrictions of marriage market models e. In contrast to this literature, our data allow us to observe the partner search process directly, providing us with information regard- ing the choice sets and partner choices. Our data also contain more detailed mate attribute information; for example, the U. Census data do not include measures of physical traits or life-style variables.

Third, an important methodological concern is whether people act strategically in a way that shades their true preferences. This concern is relevant both for our approach based on online dating data and the speed-dating literature. In Section 4, we discuss two tests for the shading hypothesis, and reject that strategic behavior plays an important role in our data.

We show how to correct for the potential bias in preference estimates due to strategic behavior. This approach can be utilized in environments where preference shading is an important concern.

One important question we cannot answer entirely is whether the estimated preferences apply to dating or other short-term relationships, or whether these preferences are also rele- vant for long-term relationships and marriages.

In Hitsch et al. Sprecher et al. However, they find some important gender differences, in particular the common finding that women place more emphasis on earnings potential relative to physical attractive- ness compared to men, in the stated mate preferences for both a short- and long-term partner. Hence, some evidence exists that mate preferences inferred from online dating behavior may also apply to long-term relationships or marriages. The ultimate test of this claim, however, may require follow-up data on marriages that result from relationships initially formed on an online dating site.

The current paper is complementary to a related study, Hitsch et al. Hitsch et al. This paper also provides an extended description of the data and a full discussion of strategic behavior. The users indicate various demographic, socioeconomic, and physical characteristics, such as their age, gender, education level, height, weight, and income. In addition, the users provide information that relates to their personality, 2 Lee and Banerjee et al. The data used byLee allow her to follow the users of a matchmaking service through several stages of the dating process until an eventual marriage, and she adds a learning component to the choice model.

For example, the site members indicate whether they are divorced, whether they have children, their religious and political views, and whether they are open to dating a partner with a different ethnic background. All this information is either numeric such as age and weight or an answer to a multiple-choice question, and hence quantifiable and usable for our statistical analysis.

The users can also answer essay questions that provide more detailed information about their attitudes and personalities. Our analysis cannot use this information. Many users also include one or more photos in their profile. After registering, the users can browse, search, and interact with the other members of the dating service.

Typically, users start their search by indicating in a databse query form a preferred age range and geographic location for their partners. By clicking on one of the short profiles, the searcher can view the full user profile, which contains socioeconomic and demographic information, a larger version of the profile photo and possibly additional photos , and answers to several essay questions.

Upon reviewing this detailed profile, the searcher decides whether to send an e-mail to the user. Our data contain a detailed, second-by-second account of all these user activities.

We estimate mate preferences using a novel data set from an online dating service. The data set contains detailed information on user attributes and the decision to contact a potential mate after viewing his or her profile.

This decision provides the basis for our preference estimation approach. A potential problem arises if the site users strategically shade their true preferences. We provide a simple test and a bias correction method for strategic behavior. The main findings are i There is no evidence for strategic behavior. ii Men and women have a strong preference for similarity along many but not all attributes.

iii In particular, the site users display strong same-race preferences. Race preferences do not differ across users with different age, income, or education levels in the case of women, and differ only slightly in the case of men. iv There are gender differences in mate preferences; in particular, women have a stronger preference than men for income over physical attributes.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution. Rent this article via DeepDyve. Lee and Banerjee et al. The data used by Lee allow her to follow the users of a matchmaking service through several stages of the dating process until an eventual marriage, and she adds a learning component to the choice model.

Neither the names nor any contact information of the users were provided to us in order to protect the privacy of the users. In Hitsch et al. Biddle and Hamermesh report a Cronbach alpha of 0. Adachi shows a strategic substitutability property in that more selective behavior higher reservation utilities by women men leads, in equilibrium, to less selective behavior lower reservation utilities by men women.

Although especially Adachi pushes the realism of these models significantly forward by allowing agents to possess very general preferences. We estimated the model in MATLAB using the KNITRO nonlinear optimization solver. Instead of concentrating out the fixed effects, we estimated all fixed effects directly along with the preference parameters. Using an analytic gradient and Hessian, convergence always occurred in less than 10 steps and in less than s.

The main cost associated with sending an e-mail is the cost of composing it. The fear of rejection should be mitigated by the anonymity provided by the dating site. To be precise: The probability that m receives a reply from w is determined by the utility function U W x w , x m , i.

the preference of a woman with attributes x w for a man with attributes x m. We resample over individuals rather than individual choice instances to preserve within-person dependence structure. The opposite interpretation of time on market is possible if bad types reveal their unobserved quality during a date, are then rejected and hence stay longer in the market. The estimates based on the predicted reply probabilities without an excluded from the first-contact decision variable are similar.

The effect is slightly positive and statistically significant for men in the 30—39 and 40—49 age groups, and statistically insignificant otherwise. Most recent speed dating papers do not report age preferences, due to the small amount of variation in age among the students that comprise many of the analyzed samples.

The exception is Kurzban and Weeden , who consider only preferences over the age level, but not the age relative to a potential partner.

More precisely, we estimate preferences over BMI differences that are at least 2 in absolute value. Using data from speed dating events, Eastwick et al.

Their study, however, does not report gender differences. Adachi, H. A search model of two-sided matching under nontransferable utility. Journal of Economic Theory, , — Article Google Scholar. Banerjee, A. Marry for what? Caste and mate selection in modern India. Manuscript MIT. Becker, G. A theory of marriage: Part I. Journal of Political Economy, 81 4 , — Biddle, J.

Journal of Labor Economics, 16 1 , — Browning, M. The economics of the family. Burdett, K. Marriage and class. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 1 , — Buss, D. Sex differences in human mate preferences: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 12 , 1— The evolution of desire: Strategies of human mating.

New York: Basic Books. Google Scholar. Sexual strategies theory: An evolutionary perspective on human mating. Psychological Review, 2 , — Choo, E. Who marries whom and why. Journal of Political Economy, 1 , — Eagly, A. The origins of sex differences in human behavior. American Psychologist, 54 6 , — Eastwick, P. Sex differences in mate preferences revisited: Do people know what they initially desire in a romantic partner? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94 2 , — Is love colorblind?

Political orientation and interracial romantic desire. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 35 9 , — Etcoff, N. Survival of the prettiest: The science of beauty. New York: Doubleday Books. Finkel, E. Baumeister Attraction and rejection. Finkel Eds. New York: Oxford University Press. Fisman, R. Gender differences in mate selection: Evidence from a speed dating experiment.

Quarterly Journal of Economics, 2 , — Racial preferences in dating. Review of Economic Studies, 75 , — Gillis, J. The male-taller norm in mate selection. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 6 3 , — Goldberger, A. Abnormal selection bias. Karlin, T. Goodman Eds. New York: Academic.

Hamermesh, D. Beauty and the labor market. American Economic Review, 84 5 , — Heckman, J. Sample selection bias as specification error.

What Makes You Click? – Mate Preferences in Online Dating,Using the Gale-Shapley algorithm, We also find that we can predict

 · We estimate mate preferences using a novel data set from an online dating service. The data set contains detailed information on user attributes and the decision to We use a large-scale dataset from a commercial online dating site to examine individuals' decisions to approach and select potential romantic partners. To understand what features What makes you click mate preferences in online dating. starbuzz usa nfl stars dating celebs blogger.com online dating addiction statistics Now you really know a lot more about each We estimate mate preferences using a novel data set from an online dating service. The data set contains detailed information on user attributes and the decision to contact a We estimate mate preferences using a novel data set from an online dating service. The data set contains detailed information on user attributes and the decision to contact a potential mate ... read more

Itamar Simonson. American Economic Review, 80 2 , — Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 6 3 , — Evidence from ethnic riots in India. Need an account? New Evidence on the Causal Link Between the Quantity and Quality of Children. Distinctive patterns arise by.

Varieties of selection bias. Body mass index BMI 17 Men and women differ strongly in their preferences for the weight of a potential mate. One CPS sample is representative of the general population in Boston and San Diego, the other is restricted to Internet users in the two metropolitan areas. Untangling the Direct and Indirect Efiects of Body Mass Dynamics on Earnings. Econometrica, 47 1—

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